Large format Artwork

Image Quality

Please “zoom” or “magnify” your image on your screen until the image is 100% at the size you will be printing, to get a preview of image quality. The goldfish above appear identical on the screen but when zoomed up the one on the left is “low resolution” and might not look good printed (unless you are standing very far from the banner). The one on the right is “high resolution” and will print fine when blown up to banner size.

Resolution

Vector Artwork (usually .AI or PDF) can be blown up to any size with no pixelation and is the preferred file format for printing large items such as Canopies, Flags, Table Covers and Displays. 

All other artwork should meet minumum resolution for good results: ideal range is 100dpi to 150dpi at actual printed size (FEET not INCHES). 

Artwork can be setup in inches=feet if art is 1200 dpi.

For example a 3 foot x 6 foot banner is ideally 36 inches x 72 inches at 100 dpi. Exactly the same resolution is 3 Inch x 6 Inch image at 1200 dpi (we will blow it up 1200% for printing). Many experienced graphic artists send us art at 72 dpi, 75 dpi, 100 dpi, and they all turn out great. 300 dpi is NOT necessary and creates unnecessarily large file sizes. FYI your computer screen is probably 72-100 dpi and you can read this text and see fine detail in photographs. Your banner is much larger than a computer screen and viewed from a greater distance. PSD’s also create large files, convert to JPG’s (maximum quality) before sending.

CMYK vs RGB

A good rule of thumb is anything dealing with the web should always be in RGB and printed material should be in CMYK.

RGB refers to the primary colors of light, Red, Green and Blue, that are used in monitors, television screens, digital cameras and scanners. CMYK refers to the primary colors of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. ... The combination ofRGB light creates white, while the combination of CMYK inks creates black.

Flat Rate Products

Resolution

In order for an image to print correctly, all file formats must be submitted at a resolution of 300 dpi at 100% of the final print size. When file resolution is lower than 300 dpi, the final print will have a substantial drop in the image quality.

A resolution of 300 dpi means 300 dots per every inch in the design.

Bleed

In printing terminology, the bleed is the extra margin on a print product that is meant to be trimmed off when the product is trimmed to its final size. Bleed basically means that the color and graphics on a product "bleed off the page" to ensure continuity of the color to the edge of your product.For the best results, please download the product templates from our download templates page.

When we print products such as business cards and postcards, we do not print on paper of that size. We gang-run print, which means that we organize several print jobs next to one another on a large sheet of paper, print, and then trim each individual product to its final size. Jobs cannot be trimmed perfectly on the trimming line each time. During the trimming process, a product may be trimmed within or beyond the trimming line. As a result, the product may have a white edge, or a portion of the artwork from the surrounding jobs. Thus, we require a bleed on each individual product so that when the product is trimmed, there is an extra margin to prevent imperfections.

A full bleed is required for all print-ready files. For the correct bleed for your product, please view the list below. For example, most business cards have a 0.25" bleed, so a 2" x 3.5" business card without round corners will have a bleed size of 2.25" x 3.75".

Borders

Borders are not recommended due to cutting shifts. If your product is not trimmed exactly on the trimming line, borders may appear uneven. Especially for small products such as business cards, even half a millimeter of cutting shift may cause the borders to look uneven.

CMYK vs RGB

A good rule of thumb is anything dealing with the web should always be in RGB and printed material should be in CMYK.

RGB refers to the primary colors of light, Red, Green and Blue, that are used in monitors, television screens, digital cameras and scanners. CMYK refers to the primary colors of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. ... The combination ofRGB light creates white, while the combination of CMYK inks creates black.